Tuesday, February 5, 2019

NOTORIOUS Ben Hecht, new biography of Hollywood's most legendary screenwriter, who shattered media silence on Nazi slaughter of Jews















About the Early-Roaring 20's Hecht, who had multiple hits on Broadway including "Front Page." He resided at the Algonquin Hotel with the literary Round Table. For the curious...The Legendary Algonquin Round Table! Here "the Vicious Circle" where this infamous gang of whiplash wits gathered each week for lunch during the Roaring Twenties. 

The Round Tablers, who transformed American theater, comedy and the portrayal of journalism in popular culture, besides HECHT included Dorothy Parker, Harold Ross (founder of The New Yorker) and Robert Benchley; columnists Franklin Pierce Adams and Heywood Broun; critic Alexander Woollcott; comedian Harpo Marx; and playwrights George S. Kaufman, Marc Connelly, and Robert Sherwood. Algonquinite Edna Ferber called them “The Poison Squad,” and wrote, “They were actually merciless if they disapproved. I have never encountered a more hard-bitten crew. But if they liked what you had done, they did say so publicly and whole-heartedly.”

NOTORIOUS BEN HECHT was launched!  March 15 the book is published. Want one in advance. paper



Ben Hecht’s world, dominated by a madman and the response of the Big 3 Allies. 
NOTORIOUS BEN HECHT, 
the “Shakespeare of Hollywood,” was prescient about the annhilation of Europe’s Jews and an activist for survival. Propaganda, fanning hate and division, disruption as progress? This was his world also….. 

This book in paper  has just arrived in the Purdue University Press warehouse. http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/titles/format/9781557538659

The Notorious Ben Hecht, a new biography from Purdue University Press, is the
FIRST Extensive bio of Hecht, who defined his age and is again new in our time.

Ben Hecht is Hollywood’s most legendary screenwriter, but he is arguably more significant as the man who shattered the American media silence about the Nazi slaughter of European Jews. He started as a crime reporter on Chicago's gritty streets before becoming famous as a Broadway playwright with his classic newspaper comedy The Front Page. As a screenwriter, Hecht defined Hollywood’s Golden Age with scripts that included Scarface, Gone with the Wind, and Notorious.

A ferocious wit with a genius for spectacle and controversy, Hecht responded to the rise of Hitler with a massive publicity campaign that awoke the American public to the Holocaust. Soon afterward, he earned infamy when he embraced the label of Jewish “terrorist” and joined with the gangster Mickey Cohen to smuggle weapons to Palestine in the fight for a Jewish state. Julien Gorbach's biography, The Notorious Ben Hecht: Iconoclastic Writer and Military Zionist (Purdue University Press, March 2019), investigates the life and multifaceted character of this storytelling virtuoso and provocateur.

Pauline Kael, revered film critic for The New Yorker, credited Hecht with having written half the entertaining films Hollywood ever produced. Ironically, Hecht’s commercial success, as the author of many movie melodramas, damaged his literary reputation.

“He also operated in so many genres that one life—no matter how colorful, no matter how full—barely seems to have encompassed what he achieved, in journalism, in literature, on the screen, and in polemics,” said noted historian Stephen Whitfield. “Yet until now—that is, until the publication of Julien Gorbach’s lively biographical study—Hecht has eluded the grasp of scholarship. The Notorious Ben Hecht is thus a welcome corrective.”

Hecht’s importance as a versatile modern writer does not diminish the role he played in history. Born shortly before the start of the twentieth century, he came of age with the advent of mass communication, and his story vividly illustrates how mass media changed the character of our culture. But, he was among the most prominent and influential disputants in a clash of political ideas that came with the rise of Nazism, the Holocaust, and the birth of Israel.

During the 1930s, his grim view of what he called “the soul of man” allowed him to see, with far greater clarity than most, the horror at the world’s doorstep. He offered a warning, not just to the people of his day, we would do well to rediscover Ben Hecht in this time.

Advance Praise for The Notorious Ben Hecht

"Gorbach’s work accomplishes what a good biography should: It focuses on an important and interesting figure; describes a little-explored aspect of his life that affected world events; makes a larger point about the society in which he lived; and does it in a clear, coherent, and captivating fashion. The importance of Ben Hecht lies in its major theme: Hecht’s willingness to stand out as a Jew and advocate for Jewish causes when most successful Jews of his generation sublimated their ethnic identity. Hecht and the Irgun advocated increasingly extreme and violent measures. To Hecht and the Irgun, the murder of six million Jews while the world watched proved they could not count on the international community."

—Laurel Leff, Associate Professor, School of Journalism, and Stotsky Professor of
Jewish Historical and Cultural Studies, Northeastern University; Author, Buried by The Times: The Holocaust and America’s Most Important Newspaper (Cambridge University Press, 2005)

"Julien Gorbach has done more than anyone before to shine a light into the darkness of the connections between Chicago’s underworld and its rawboned journalism. While previous celebrations of Chicago’s dailies during the age of newspapers’ ascendancy made sport of recklessness, fabrication, and violence, Gorbach has revealed the ‘devil’s bargain’ struck most notably by Ben Hecht, whose own life touches the 52 lightheartedness of The Front Page only tangentially. Hecht publicly laughed at journalism while obscuring its worst secrets."

—Dr. Michael Sweeney, Editor, Journalism History;
Associate Director for Graduate Studies, Ohio University

The Notorious Ben Hecht: Iconoclastic Zionist and Militant Zionist
Purdue University Press, March 2019

Author Julien Gorbach spent most of his ten years as a daily newspaper reporter on the police beat, covering drive-by shootings and murder trials, and publishing an investigative series on killings that remained unsolved because gangs had intimidated witnesses into silence. As a freelancer, he contributed to the Boston Phoenix, Time Out New York, the San Francisco Bay Guardian, and the New Orleans Gambit, among other publications. He covered Hurricane Katrina for the Boston Globe. Currently, Gorbach is an Asst. Professor at the University of Hawaii.

S.W.

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