Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Torn Page's HAMLET, alive and tribal in an intimate setting. Access Theatre, June 2nd & 9th



There's been a fashion of  professional theater performed in apartments but until this HAMLET, I hadn't experienced this. A real surprise  how unexpectedly alive and vital this production was in an
intimate chair-filled livingroom where actors and spectators were on the same level. This wasn't experimental as much as a classic restored to the bones of what's essentially a family play--dysfunctional to be sure but a moving discovery in this audacious show.

The lead (Melissa Nelson) is a young woman, who looked like a Danish boy yet within minutes commanded with a rational self-possession that trumped her torment. Despite the many cries of "Madness!" and her circumlocutions of language, you question that charge. Relentless as any prosecutor, Hamlet investigates her stepfather and mother, accused by her father's ghost.

Though you know the stages of her investigation, the process and outcome, this performance, rational and impassioned, is riveting. Also surprising is how, possessed by her mission, she slipped over
chairs to turn on music without a pause.

The rest of the cast is equally adept. Though the ostensible logic hinges on Hamlet's "madness," and denial of the crime of The King and his Queen and you know it's false, ( Khari Constantine) King Claudius was so personable, it was hard to believe him guilty. He also slipped into the role of the "Player King", undetected by me. (Gayle Staffanson) his lady Gertrude, was so sensual, pleasure seemed a natural right. It was horrifying to see her try to manipulate her son back to "normalcy."

Laertes, the much wronged brother of Ophelia and son of Polonius, is played convincingly by another young woman (Kiran Rhe). Noble and manly in a decent way, you a feel loss, that he's a victim of  Hamlet's one "Mad" act in this play. (Bruce Barton) Polonious was perfectly matched in both dignity and foolishness, as was (Gigi Coovrey, also the Player Queen), his daughter's sensitive but not neurotic Ophelia.

(Andrew Gonzales) Hamlet's only genuine friend, is steadfast, seeing through subterfuges of the spies around his Prince, such as Nicholas Cocks' Guilderstern, who's a less than guileless betrayer. He and Rosencrantz make a contrasting pair.

Last and most surprising is (Vincent Santvoord) the Gravedigger, whose language is a knowing counterpart to that of Hamlet. The Prince well understand's this "fool"s  barbed double meanings. The two are most alike in this play. The Prince's fateful truth and the Gravedigger's humor are two sides of the same question.  Santvoord's words challenging the Prince and the reality underlying all human deeds, heroic and otherwise, is completely entertaining.

In the intimate setting of this show, sounds underscored tribal feelings. Drums, didgeridoos and voices, alternated or exclamations,evoked some medieval hall with a lot of spilled mead as the saga unfolded. The production was adapted and directed by Matthew Gasda.

I saw May 20th weekend but Torn Page will again offer HAMLET June 2 & 9 at Access Theatre.
380 Broadway.

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/hamlet-tickets-45960107920?aff=es2

S.W.